Discuss drinking and driving myths with your child

Discuss drinking and driving myths with your child

On Behalf of | Aug 28, 2020 | Drunk Driving |

People inexperienced with drinking alcohol may not fully know how even a single drink will affect them. As your child reaches the legal drinking age, you may anticipate him or her having a few drinks and likely going out with friends. While you want to trust your child to make good decisions, you likely also know that the wrong information could result in poor choices.

Though your child’s friends may not have any ill intentions toward him or her, they may not always provide your child with the best insight when it comes to drinking responsibly or sobering up. As a result, you may want to take the time to dispel some common myths associated with drinking and driving.

Have you heard these before?

Unfortunately, numerous myths about drinking and sobering up continue to be taken as fact, especially by young people. Some topics you may want to cover with your child include the following:

  • Inform your child that coffee will not sober him or her up quicker. Sobering up only happens when alcohol leaves the body, and coffee does not speed up that process.
  • Tell your child that splashing his or her face with cold water or taking a cold shower will not counteract the effects of intoxication either. 
  • Make sure your child knows that beer and hard liquor can both cause impairment and that all standard-size drinks have the same amount of alcohol, such as a 12-ounce beer having the same amount as a 5-ounce glass of wine or a shot of whiskey.
  • Discuss how alcohol can affect people of different sizes differently. If your child has a smaller stature, he or she may become intoxicated more quickly than a taller or heavier friend.

These examples are only a few of the many myths that circulate about drinking and about combating intoxication in order to drive. In efforts to help your child avoid drinking and driving, you may want to offer to pick him or her up from parties or otherwise ensure that a safe ride home is readily available.

Young people make mistakes

Of course, try as you might to ensure that your child understands the dangers of drinking and driving and the myths he or she might hear from friends, young people can make serious mistakes. If your child ends up pulled over and charged with DUI, you may want to gain information on possible criminal defense options by contacting a Texas attorney.

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